What is “Books in Bars?”

BIBWhen my friend Linda Ortino and I started discussing holding an event at her family’s bar/restaurant, Ortino’s Northside, I thought we should try something different. QVC viewers will recognize Linda. She was a QVC model for many years (Nolan Miller, Stan Herman, Quacker Factory, etc.) and is now an on-air guest with a variety of products. She was always a blast to work with in the studio. I haven’t seen Linda in years, so I’m excited to visit!

Anyway, you might be asking, but what is “Books in Bars?”

“Books in Bars” is simply a happy hour for people who enjoy reading books. Think of it as a networking event for book readers – in a bar! You won’t have to listen to an author read. No highbrow literary diploma needed. Did I mention the event is held in a bar? Just enjoy happy hour specials while discussing books with other avid readers. Meet other book lovers and learn about their favorite books, authors, and genres. You may walk away with a larger “To Be Read” list.

For the Sunday, November 9th event, the Ortino family is generously offering a 1/2 price appetizer menu, 1/2 price Margaritas, and $3 Craft Draft Specials. Ortino’s Northside is located at 1355 Gravel Pike, Perkiomenville, PA. Books in Bars will run from 3pm – 6pm. Their phone number is (610)287-7272.

Each Books in Bars event will feature two writers with recently published books. On Sunday, November 9th, the writers will be me and my friend (and former QVCer) Robb Cadigan, who is the author of the popular novel Phoenixville Rising. Yeah, you can buy a book if you would like, but there is no pressure. Writers happen to enjoy talking about books in bars.

Books in Bars will be an occasional series. We have chatted with bar owners about holding possible future events in Phoenixville, West Chester, and Media. To sign up and receive email notices about upcoming Books in Bars events, click here. Also, if you are on Twitter, reach us at @BooksInBars.

Writer’s Digest quotes my #nanowrimo advice

Are you doing #nanowrimo this year?

I’ve participated in National Novel Writing Month twice over the years and blogged about the experience back in 2010. In their latest issue, Writer’s Digest quoted me about the experience, which is kinda cool. On newsstands now! If you’d like to read my entire post blog post about #nanowrimo, click here. If you are hunkering down this November to partake in #nanowrimo, good luck! WRITERSDIGEST

Thanks, Shoplandia Readers! Loving these tweets!

Twitter makes me happy. So much fun to see responses and reviews pop up during each Twitter check-in. Thank you. If you haven’t read Shoplandia, order your copy today.

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Philadelphia Inquirer reviews Shoplandia

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Thanks to the Philadelphia Inquirer for their recent review of Shoplandia. The online version of the article was titled: ‘Shoplandia': Delightful exploration of the glitzy, manic world of home-shopping TV. Holly Love’s review ended with this gem: “Despite a smiley-face ending, this novel is worth its weight in all the gold, silver, and crystal jewelry now on clearance prices until midnight. Give me 10,000 copies. I’d gladly give it a go selling them on QVC myself.” You can read the full review by clicking HERE.

My One Question for David Lynch

IMG_3270Okay, total geekboy moment for me tonight. Film director David Lynch returned to his college stomping grounds – Philadelphia – for a retrospective. Lynch attended the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts several decades ago. I was lucky enough to sit in the second row of the Prince Music Theater where he was interviewed before a screening of his film Lost Highway. During the interview, he took questions from the audience, so I asked him, “Can you tell us about how your time here in Philly influenced your work, and what you think of the city now?”

Lynch responded by recalling a building near his apartment that was completely covered in black soot. He then said, “Every place had a kind of a mood but swimming in the atmosphere was huge fear and a chance for big violence. There was a feeling of corruption, there was a feeling of despair, there was feeling insanity. And it all sort of swam together. Now the city seems much brighter and cleaner and more ordinary to me.”

Directly after my question, David Lynch was asked about how he ended up with a role in Louis CK’s show Louie.

IMG_3286“I think there were about fourteen people ahead of me for that role, and they all turned Louie down. Louie wrote me these letters, and I turned him down a couple of times, and he wrote beautiful letters, and then I read the scripts and the scripts were really great – really great – and Louie said they came pouring out in one continuous waterfall. I was really impressed. I didn’t want to do it because it’s a very frightening thing to act and I don’t like to travel too much and he got me to go from LA to New York and go into a hotel and act, so he is a pretty incredible guy.”

One more note: I’m pretty happy that I refrained from blurting out that I had gone to see Blue Velvet alone on Valentine’s Day the year it came out and the cashier slipped me a candy heart with my change which was strange and I sat in the Roxy Theatre in Philly and almost walked out at the first set of disturbing scenes but then ten minutes later I was laughing hysterically at the famous Dean Stockwell party scene and then ten minutes later I was sniffling as Jeffrey Beaumont lay battered in his room and that I left that movie theatre that day in shock and had to walk across the city back to my apartment at 9th and Lombard, which was the most frightening experience in my adult life.

Yeah, so I’m pretty happy I refrained blurting all that out.

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Pop Culture Tonight

Pop-culture

I was thrilled to be interviewed recently by Patrick Phillips of the syndicated radio show Pop Culture Tonight. It turns out Patrick is a fan of QVC, and often has it on his television while working. We had a fun time chatting about real life in a shopping studio and some of the funny moments in the novel. Pop Culture Tonight is a unique show that interviews people from all aspects of pop culture. It was cool to see he had recently interviewed Lloyd Schwartz of the Brady Bunch, Alfred Molina, Marc Somers, and even Marion Ross of Happy Days fame!

Pop Culture Tonight airs in Detroit, Michigan’s WROM Radio, KAZI 88.7, and Independent Talk KFNX 1100. The show can also be listened to directly from the Pop Culture Tonight website. My interview should be available in a few days. Thanks Patrick for having me as a guest!

If you are visiting my website after listening to the show, check out the menu above and click on Studio Photos to see some of the celebrities I’ve encountered through the years. If you are looking to pick up a copy of SHOPLANDIA, here’s a link to order from Amazon. Do you want to give that home shopping fanatic friend of yours a gift? Personalized copies can be ordered by clicking here.

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Robin Black’s Life Drawing: A Review

lifedrawing3DLet’s consider MAA: Middle Age Adult novels. Robin Black’s new novel, Life Drawing, is a quiet, but powerful novel about marriage and the attempt to recover from betrayal. The story revolves around a couple striving to go the distance in their work and life. They are married and in their late forties, she (Gus) is a painter and he (Owen) is a writer. They live an idyllic life in the country, and they are now more passionate about their work than each other. When a new neighbor moves in across the way, their quiet lives are more than shaken up.

At the core of the novel, which is written in the first person from the wife Gus’s perspective, is her conflicted feelings about an affair she had years ago. Consider this passage where she reflects:

To what exactly had I felt entitled with Bill? There is an answer: Joy. Not happiness, which by that time seemed a fantasy one had to agree to give up in order to keep from going mad. By forty, is there anyone who hasn’t had to recognize that happiness, as understood by youth, as illusory?”

And later, she reflects:

The betrayer doesn’t get much sympathy, not even from herself, but it is in fact a heavy weight to have hurt someone you love, and it can be difficult even years later to detect any impermeable boundaries around the damage you may have done.

Gus’s reflection on the affair, along with a visit from the daughter of her love, stir up the pot. When the neighbor’s daughter comes to stay, and develops a crush on Owen, the strings of this novel are pulled taut. I loved the conversation between the couple on their ride to Cape Cod, where Gus declares:

“Great. I’m the chauffeur and she’s the inspiration.”

There’s more than the affair swirling around in this novel. Gus works to bring WWI soldiers back to life through her art, and her frequent visits with her ailing father provide texture to the discourse on memory of one’s loves. Robin Black is an eloquent writer and Life Drawing is a page turner with a tragic ending.